Posted in BE SAFE, Building Evacuation, Disaster Preparedness, Earthquakes, Emergency Evacuations, Fire Safety, Health & Welfare, Hurricanes, Terrorism, Tsunamis, Uncategorized, Version 2.0

Social Media Saves Lives

Twitter bird with important announcement
Social Media such as Twitter are being used for emergency communications.

While some might think that websites like Twitter are only good for tracking celebrity exploits, they are proving incredibly useful for disaster preparation and emergency management.

For Twitter, I like to follow #SquirrelChasers and #HomemadeJerky. For my own tweets, I keep it simple with posts such as “four-hour nap” and “awesome tail-chasing session.”
For their part, FEMA is adopting social media websites to share information about disasters and coordination efforts. Created in response to the successful use social media following the Haiti earthquake in 2010, the FEMA initiatives aim to harness the power of social media to spread life-saving, instantaneous information.

Social Media in Action

During the recent floods in Australia, social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook were instrumental for use in organizing-efforts. I like to use My Dog Space, where I currently have the second most friends on the site. I’m gunning for you “schnauzertown57!”

The emergency services in Queensland relied on social media sites for real-time updates on conditions in different areas. This data was used to allocate limited resources and aided in overall disaster planning. My Facebook friends and I use group data to find the best spots for trashcan diving and the greenest lawns for marking.

The Australia floods highlighted the particular strengths of Facebook and Twitter, the two most popular social sites. I’m still trying to get http://www.PamperYourPooch.net off the ground, but I’m having trouble securing angel investing.

Twitter proved most valuable as a way to spread information very rapidly and widely. During the floods, there were an estimated 1,200 flood-related status updates to Twitter “Tweets” per hour. The short (140) character lengths and ability to quickly “follow” those who were posting pertinent information allowed many residents to stay safe.

Facebook was utilized for providing more detail and acting as a way to manage relief activities. One example of this occurred when an area animal shelter was at risk of flooding. Facebook was used to find homes for all of the displaced animals. Now that’s pretty awesome!

In all instances of the use of social media in disasters, the public becomes a valuable resource for helping aid the efforts of emergency management professionals. Acting as “first responders,” the general public can provide immediate information which can be used to affect the routing of emergency supplies and other emergency management efforts.

For emergency management officials, it’s important to keep an eye on the information flowing from the Social Media universe. Any grossly erroneous information should be quickly rebutted from official sources since one downside to the speed of social media is that misinformation can proliferate. For example, MeanTabby1 once posted a rumor about my coat. I quickly took to the dogosphere to nip the gossip in the bud! As you can see, it’s important to monitor the social conversation. According to a Red Cross survey, 69 percent of respondents fully expect emergency management agencies to actively monitor and respond to emergency requests via social media sites.

Another recent use of social media was during the January blizzard that affected the Midwest. In Chicago, road clearing management personnel posted real-time progress of plowing efforts using phones or tablet devices. The National Weather service was also involved, through its efforts in spreading alerts through Twitter and Facebook.

Social Media use during the floods and other disasters also act as aggregators of public sentiment and concern. Officials can use social media data to prepare official videos or flyers that address particular needs. If you people followed our favorite dog sites, they would see we would like more resources allocated to pig ears and mud piles.

Social Media is a great medium for members of the general public and official emergency agencies to work together for the common good. By responsibly using the platform, the public can quickly learn what is happening and where they can go to help, while emergency officials can discover where to send rescue teams and allocate resources. In a broader sense, the usage of social media sites helps us all stay connected on a basic level, which is the whole point!

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact RJ Westmore, Inc. Our new Version 2.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. Visit RJWestmore.com for more information and remember to BE SAFE.

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Author:

RJ the Fire Dog is the mascot for Allied Universal, the premiere provider for e-based fire life safety training for residents and workers in high-rise buildings. His young son, JR, sometimes takes over writing his posts. RJ also maintains an active Twitter account, which he posts to when he isn’t working in the firehouse. The Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System helps commercial buildings with compliance to fire life safety codes. Our interactive, building-specific e-learning training system motivates and rewards tenants instantly! It’s a convenient and affordable solution to all of the training needs of your building(s). Choosing our service cuts property management training related workloads by 90% and saves you over 50%

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