Posted in BE SAFE, Disaster Preparedness, How to stay healthy, Uncategorized, Workplace Safety

Happy National Ergonomics Month

Ergonimics DiagramOctober is National Ergonomics Month. That’s a weird word. Calling attention to the importance of effective work environments, the campaign is meant to help refine office product design for maximum health and safety. Concentrating mostly on efficient construction and use of office chairs, desks, computers and keyboards, the field of applied ergonomics is crucial. I wonder if my doghouse is ergonomic. Continue reading “Happy National Ergonomics Month”

Posted in BE SAFE, Cancer Prevention, Health & Welfare, How to stay healthy, Uncategorized

Happy National Wellness Month

Human Hand Drawing Wellness Concept“Good health is not something we can buy. However, it can be an extremely valuable savings account.” ~Anne Wilson Schaef

Wise words indeed. Inspired by that wisdom, Wellness Month was created “to inspire consumers to focus on wellbeing.” The August observance promotes the process of assessing and potentially improving emotional and physical health. Few would argue the value of investing in improving self-health. For the record, I would also argue daily consumption of bacon. Continue reading “Happy National Wellness Month”

Posted in BE SAFE, Fire Life Safety Training, Health & Welfare, Heart Disease, How to stay healthy, Workplace Safety

May is Health & Fitness Month

Global Employee Health & Fitness Month (GEHFM)Employee Wellness program written on a notepad with marker. is an international observance of health and fitness in the workplace during the month of May. The goal is to promote the benefits of living a healthy lifestyle to employers and their employees through worksite health promotion activities. Sponsored by MINDBODY, the campaign began in 1989, to promote the value of investing in employee health. Sounds like a good idea to me!

Workplace wellness takes many forms. So, the final program may look different from one organization to another. Your workplace wellness plan should be tailored to reflect the culture of your organization in the way that will most likely encourage your employees to stay healthy and fit. The Office of Disease & Health Promotion at Health.Gov lists five reasons wellness is worth the investment: Continue reading “May is Health & Fitness Month”

Posted in BE SAFE, CDC, Dept of Health & Human Services, Health & Welfare, Highly Infectious diseases, How to stay healthy, Uncategorized

6 Ways to Avoid the Flu

flu germ 2019The 2019 flu season is well underway. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) estimates that six to seven million people have suffered one strain of influenza or another already this season. DogFlu.com reports two strains of dog influenza appearing in virtually every state. The CDC puts the number of (human strains) of flu-related hospitalizations, nationwide, between 69,000 and 84,000 people. With flu activity expected to continue in the coming weeks and months, we are focusing this week’s blog post on the preemptive measures you can take to stay healthy and avoid this unwelcome harbinger of winter. flu bug influenza

What is the Flu?

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by various strains of influenza viruses. Symptoms range from mild to severe, with serious outcomes resulting in hospitalization or even death. Certain people groups, such as the elderly, young children or anyone who has a compromised immune system face an increased risk of serious flu-related complications. Even relatively healthy people prefer to skip the virus altogether. Yeah, the flu (canine or the human variety) isn’t fun.

Flu & Cold Virus InfluenzaSymptoms include:

cold-or-flu-large
How the Flu Differs from a Common Cold

Although the flu and colds are respiratory illnesses, they are brought on by different viruses. Both viruses impact the upper respiratory system and share similar symptoms.  As a result, suffers often struggle to tell the difference between the two. Most of the time, when it’s a cold, people are able to suffer through a runny or stuffy nose and rebound in a week. With the flu, symptoms are typically more intense and have the potential to lead to serious complications, such as pneumonia, bacterial infections or hospitalizations.

handwashing flu germsHow to Avoid Catching the Flu:

  1. Avoid close contact with sick people or puppies. If you must share airspace with them, wear a mask, whichmay help block airborne germs and prevent the transmission of germs from your hands to your mouth or nose. This seems wise for preventing the spread of other illnesses, too. Just a thought.
  2. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. After using a tissue, throw it in the trash and wash your hands. If you don’t have access to a tissue, sneeze into your sleeve to limit the spread of germs.
  3. Frequently wash your hands with soap and hot water. If neither is available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. I’m not a fan of hand sanitizer because it makes my fur wet.
  4. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth to limit the spread of germs.
  5. Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated.
  6. The CDC recommends getting the flu shot. Although several strains of flu exist, the injection combats many. online fire safety training

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Posted in BE SAFE, Disaster Preparedness, Holiday Safety, How to stay healthy, Uncategorized

Holiday Food Safety

Holiday Food SafetyThe holidays are a wonderful time to celebrate with family and friends over delicious food and drinks (make mine water). But be careful to incorporate safety precautions into your meal prep to help keep everyone you love in good health. According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), 48 million people get sick; 128,000 are hospitalized; and 3,000 people die from foodborne diseases each year in the United States. Continue reading “Holiday Food Safety”

Posted in BE SAFE, CDC, Children in Crisis, Health & Welfare, Higher Education, Highly Infectious diseases, How to stay healthy, Uncategorized, Vaccinations, Vaccines

Back-to-School Safety: College Vaccinations

School Nurse Vaccination

The following is provided for informational purposes only. Allied Universal is not a medical expert. Consult your healthcare provider before pursuing any vaccines or taking any medication.

It’s that time of year again. Leaves are turning, football has begun, the weather is cooling off, and it’s time to fill backpacks with school necessities—pens and pencils, notebooks, laptops and bacon. But when you check that all important “to-do list” this year for your student, make sure to include the most important item on the list—inoculations. Continue reading “Back-to-School Safety: College Vaccinations”

Posted in be prepared for emergencies, BE SAFE, Children in Crisis, dehydration, Disaster Preparedness, Health & Welfare, How to stay healthy, Uncategorized

Extreme Heat: Severe Weather Disasters

Extreme Weather Disasters

Part 1 in a Series

Extreme weather causes some of the most devastating natural disasters known to man and beast. Already this year, the United States has faced six weather and climate-related major disaster events, which the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reports have resulted in 36 deaths and economic losses exceeding one billion dollars. The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) breaks these disasters into eight major categories: extreme heat, floods, hurricanes, landslides and mudslides, lightning, tornadoes, tsunamis, and winter weather. I’m not sure why cats aren’t included on the list, since they’re the number one cause of disasters in my world. This week, we will discuss extreme heat. Check back for future posts, which will conclude our series about extreme weather-related disasters. Continue reading “Extreme Heat: Severe Weather Disasters”

Posted in BE SAFE, Disaster Preparedness, epidemics, Health & Welfare, How to stay healthy, Influenza, Uncategorized

Flu Impacts American Business

Influenza WorkforceWith sudden onset of congestion, body aches, fever and chills, over the past few months, millions of Americans have been battling Influenza, aka the flu. Worse yet, the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) reports that, worldwide, somewhere between 300,000 and 646,000 people die each year from seasonal flu-related respiratory illnesses.

Continue reading “Flu Impacts American Business”

Posted in be prepared for emergencies, BE SAFE, Disaster Preparedness, Health & Welfare, How to stay healthy, mental health, Uncategorized

PTSD & Mental Health

mental health memo post illustration designOut of concern for everyone who was directly or indirectly affected by recent traumatic events, for this week’s post, I will dispense with my usual “firedog-isms.” Check back next week to read my unique “canine take.”  

The term “Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder” (PTSD) was originally coined to refer to veterans of war. Now, doctors diagnose PTSD in anyone who has experienced a shocking, scary or dangerous event and suffers associated long-term physical and/or psychological symptoms. With the recent prevalence of earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, wildfires, active shooting events and other manmade and natural disasters, 13 million people worldwide are believed to suffer from the malady. Continue reading “PTSD & Mental Health”

Posted in be prepared for emergencies, BE SAFE, Biological Warfare, Health & Welfare, How to stay healthy, Uncategorized

Poison Prevention Week

image0014Did you know that poison can be found in vitamins, toys, coins, thermometers, and cosmetics? That’s a little creepy, if you ask me. These products, and your basic over-the-counter medications and cleaning products, contain the substance—albeit at very small amounts. With so many hazards to be aware of, drawing attention to the dangers of potential poisoning is the purpose of National Poison Prevention Week, March 19 to 25. Sponsored by the National Poisoning Prevention Council (NPPC), the weeklong observations will center on the following themes:

  • Monday, March 20 – Children Act Fast … So Do Poisons (Puppies act fast, too!)
  • Tuesday, March 21 – Poison Centers: Saving You Time and Money
  • Wednesday, March 22 – Poisonings Span a Lifetime
  • Thursday, March 23 – Home Safe Home
  • Friday, March 24 – Medicine Safety
    Poison bottle with a skull and crossbones label. Vector illustration.

Here are some reasons that poison prevention is extremely important:

Says the NPPC about the campaign:

“Unintentional poisoning from a wide variety of substances and environmental hazards can happen to anyone, and represents a substantial public health burden in the U.S. The National Poisoning Prevention Council is an inclusive community comprised of representatives from the public, nonprofit, and government organizations with a shared commitment to poisoning prevention and education. The Council provides a collective voice to raise awareness among the American public about the risks, frequency, and consequences of unintentional poisoning occurrences, injuries, and fatalities.”

Eat me cake. Drink Me potion. Set meal for Alice in Wonderland.Follow these tips to reduce the risk of accidental poisoning:

  • Don’t share prescription medicines. That’s a wise statement. If you are taking more than one drug at a time, check with your healthcare provider, pharmacist, or call the toll-free American Association of Poison Control Centers’ helpline (1-800-222-1222), to find out more about possible drug interactions.
  • Carbon monoxide is a form of poison. Keep a working carbon monoxide detector in your home. The best places for a CO detector are near bedrooms and close to furnaces.
  • Keep chemicals, household cleaners, medicines, and potentially poisonous substances in locked cabinets or out of the reach of children. Never mix household or chemical products together. Doing so can create a dangerous gas. And gas is a bad thing in a confined space.
  • Keep cleaning products, art products and antifreeze in their original containers. Never use food containers (such as cups or bottles) to store household cleaners and other chemicals or products.
  • Food can become poisonous if handled carelessly. And it’s criminal to waste good food! Wash hands and counters before preparing food. Use clean utensils for cooking and serving.
  • Store food at the proper temperatures. Refrigerated foods should not be left out at temperatures above 40 degrees F° (5 degrees C°).
  • Be sure that everyone in your family can identify poisonous mushrooms and plants. When it comes to poison ivy, remember this tip: “leaves of three, let it be.”
  • Venom is a form of poison. So, I guess eating snakes is right out? Good to know. Find out if poisonous snakes live in your area. Wear proper attire (boots, etc.) when hiking outdoors.
  • Check the label on any insect repellent. Be aware that most contain DEET, which can be poisonous in large quantities.

If someone ingests poison:doctor medical care bubble speech

  • Remain calm. Not all medicines, chemicals, or household products are poisonous. Not all contact with poison results in poisoning. That’s a relief.
  • Call the Poison Help line(1-800-222-1222), which connects you to the local poison center.
  • Follow the advice you receive from your poison center. Good idea!

Take steps while waiting for help to arrive:

  • If someone has inhaledpoison, get him or her to fresh air immediately. Fresh air is always a good idea.
  • If poison has touched the skin, rinse skin with running water for 15 to 20 minutes.
  • If poison gets in eyes, rinse them immediately with running water for 15 to 20 minutes.Remember that safety around toxic chemicals is important for everyone across the country, all year long. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Fire Life Training System, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.