Posted in be prepared for emergencies, BE SAFE, Disaster Preparedness, Earthquakes, Health & Welfare, High-Rise Buildings, Uncategorized

The Great Shakeout 2016

shakeout_global_getready_300x250Drop, Cover, and Hold On at 10:20 a.m. on October 20, 2016 during The Great California ShakeOut. Participating in the annual event is a great way to make sure you are prepared to survive and recover quickly from substantial earthquakes – whether you are at home, at work or traveling. Personally, I think Shake-n-Bake pork chops would be a great way to mark the occasion.

To help mark the occasion and call attention to earthquake preparedness, we want to take this opportunity to educate our subscribers and friends about earthquake preparedness in high-rise buildings. We would like to extend our thanks to Safe-T-Proof, which provided their “Quake Cottage” for a Pre-Great California Shakeout event. They offer superior earthquake fasteners and straps for offices as well as survival kits and additional earthquake-safety supplies.quakeshack

The latest and greatest in earthquake-resilient design is currently being implemented to build the Wilshire Grand Center in Los Angeles, which, at 1,100 feet, will make it the tallest building on the Pacific coast. The building’s massive foundation is so robust that its construction is noted in the Guinness Book of World Records for the “longest continuous concrete pour.” I wonder who holds the record for the longest bacon feast?

Despite how odd it feels to stand in a tall building that sways during an earthquake, modern California high-rises provide safer refuge during earthquakes than most shorter facilities. This is because architectural plans and construction for high-rise California structures built after the Sylmar quake in 1971 are required to follow stringent seismic codes. You can further improve your high-rise earthquake survival odds by taking preparedness steps.

shakeout_global_joinus_160x600Safety Tips for High-Rise Earthquakes

  • Stay put. Sitting down under a desk or doorway is the safest way to “ride out” a quake while it’s happening. Most earthquakes are relatively short. So it is safer to patiently wait a quake out instead of trying to exit the building as it moves. Even with four legs, I find it difficult to maneuver during earthquakes.
  • Stay alert. After exiting a building, tenants should move under cover in order to avoid falling debris such as panes of glass. Also, pay attention to warnings of fires or tsunamis which can follow any quake.
  • Stay informed. Tenants in high rises should be familiar with evacuation protocols for their building. A speedy yet orderly evacuation is crucial for ensuring building occupant safety. The National Fire Protection Association offers an evacuation plan video that encourages individuals to take ownership of their safety while following safety procedures.

Allied Universal offers these earthquake safety tips for anyone who may not be in a high-rise to follow:

Indoors

  • Drop to the ground. Take cover by getting under a sturdy table and hold on. Stay inside until the shaking stops.
  • Stay away from glass or anything that can fall, like light fixtures and furniture.
  • Stay in bed if you are there when the earthquake strikes.

In a Fire…R-A-C-E to Safety!

  • Rescue—Remove any employees or visitors from immediate danger.
  • Alarm—Pull the nearest Fire Alarm and call the proper emergency phone number.
  • Contain—Contain all smoke and toxic fumes by closing all doors and windows.
  • Extinguish and Evacuate—Follow all posted and verbal procedures.

Outdoorsshakeout_global_dontfreak_728x90

  • Stay where you are if you are not near any buildings, streetlights or utility wires.
  • Do not move from the area you are in until the shaking stops. Remember that aftershocks can be just as bad as the earthquake itself.

In a Moving Vehicle

  • Stop as quickly as possible, but stay in the vehicle. Avoid stopping near or under buildings, trees, overpasses and utility wires.
  • Proceed cautiously once the shaking has stopped. Avoid roads, bridges, or ramps that have been damaged.

Built to Withstand QuakesTerremoto en una ciudad

Modern high rises, such as the Wilshire Grand Center, undergo considerable earthquake modeling and testing before they are complete. Taller buildings must withstand massive amounts of force from earthquakes and wind, so engineers make sure construction will withstand the “worst case scenario.” To me, any worst case scenario involves cats.

High-Rise Earthquake Safety Features

  • Tuned mass dampers. These are massive weights that are mounted within a building and designed to move opposite to the oscillations of the structure. For example, the massive Taipei 101 skyscraper damper weighs 660 tons.
  • Simple roller bearing. This is a type of “base isolation” where the movement of the building is mitigated by bearings, which absorb some of the energy, thereby minimizing the building’s lateral movement. This is a common technique that essentially removes the structure from the ground, so it “floats” freely.
  • Sway. Engineers build the structure to withstand a certain amount of sway, knowing that there is a direct relationship between the height of the building and seconds of associated, safe side-to-side movement.

Low and extremely wide angle view of Office BuildingsBuilding design is always dynamic, with new materials and procedures explored that can make buildings safer and more aesthetically pleasing. For instance, the growing use of cross-laminated timber (CLT) is pushing architects to consider high-rise wood buildings in Seattle and other areas. Sounds like a good idea to me!

Remember that safety is a daily priority for everyone, not only those working or living in high-rise buildings. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the RJWestmore Training System by Allied Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Posted in Building Evacuation, Disaster Preparedness, Earthquakes, High-Rise Buildings

Get Ready for the 2012 Great California ShakeOut

Although hundreds of earthquakes strike the world at any given moment, we are all aware that, one day, the “Big One” may hit. If it did, would you be ready? Registration has reached nine million participants for this year’s Great California ShakeOut, to be held across the state of California on Oct. 18 at 10:18 a.m. This will be the fifth annual earthquake drill, which is designed to inspire people to “DROP, COVER & HOLD ON in case of earthquake. By the way, there is no need to hold on if you drop bacon on the floor. There is still time to register if you have not yet done so.

Kids, adults and pooches from schools, businesses, professional organizations, government agencies, neighborhoods and households all across California will take part in what is the largest earthquake drill in the world, designed to train people and pups how to safely react and recover quickly in case a major earthquake strikes California.

ShakeOut founder Mark Benthien is Director of Communication, Education, and Outreach for the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) at the University of Southern California, and Executive Director of the Earthquake Country Alliance (ECA). The ECA coordinates the California ShakeOut and SCEC coordinates with ShakeOut regions across the U.S. and around the world.

ShakeOut press conferences and activities will take place on October 18th at various venues throughout the entire state of California:

  • Los Angeles at Union Station will host the Traveling Red Table, which was created by the California Earthquake Authority (CEA) and American Red Cross (Red Cross) will highlight the Seven Steps to Earthquake Safety, with emphasis on ShakeOut registration to run-through’s of the fifth step – how to “Drop, Cover, and Hold On” when the ground shakes. Union Station will also be the primary media venue on the Great California ShakeOut day. I like hanging out at Union Station because people often drop scraps from their uneaten lunches. But that’s off of the subject.
  • The CSUN ShakeOut Festival including a Preparedness Fair, will be held from 9 am – 1 pm, at the NE corner of Sierra Quad in Los Angeles County.
  • Orange Tree Lane in San Bernardino County — From 9 a.m. until noon, there will be a Preparedness Fair at 2024. The epicenter of ShakeOut-related activities will be held at the San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands and will feature emergency equipment, emergency responders and earthquake preparedness educational activities. Orange Tree Lane is also where they hold the annual fair. Fairs are great because they are full of food. But, sorry…off subject, again!
  • Earthquake preparedness fair held from 9 am to 1 pm on CSUN’s Sierra Quad complete with informative booths, demonstrations, handouts, and prizes.
  • San Diego’s Santa Fe Station, which will focus on what to do if you are on public transportation when a major earthquake strikes.
  • In San Francisco, a Union Square ShakeOut press event will feature a choreographed ShakeOut flash dance, culminating in a mass Drop, Cover and Hold On demonstration.
  • Throughout the state, ShakeOut drills educate people at schools, work and home about how to prepare for, survive, and recover from the next damaging earthquake. And this is serious business, folks. Like we always say at RJWestmore…we save lives through training. And preparing for an earthquake could save your life!
  • Preparation messages remind Californians to secure their space, create disaster and communications plans, collect and organize disaster supplies, and take steps to safeguard their finances by strengthening their property and considering earthquake insurance. I tried to get earthquake insurance on my doghouse. But Snoopy ruined it for everyone with that whole Red Baron routine.
  • Survival messages provide correct techniques for immediate Drop, Cover and Hold On responses when the earth starts shaking – and what to do when the shaking stops to improve safety by helping the injured, preventing further damage, and evacuating from tsunami zones.
  • Recovery strategies include how to restore daily live by reconnecting with others, repairing damage and rebuilding our communities.

ShakeOut participation is free and takes only a few minutes. Information about how to register and participate is found at http://www.shakeout.org/california. “Don’t be left out of the ShakeOut!”

ShakeOut began as a Southern California drill, quickly spread statewide, throughout the West, and then to the Central and Southeast U.S., as well as to several U.S. Territories, Canada, New Zealand, Japan, and Italy. Additional people and organizations in many other states and countries are also registering independent drills.

“It’s amazing to see how quickly this has become a worldwide movement,” said Benthien. “ShakeOut is a fun and easy way for people, organizations and communities in many regions to get prepared now, together, before major earthquakes.”

According to ShakeOut organizers, 4.5 million people across the U.S. have participated in Great ShakeOut events already this year—in the Central U.S., Utah, and even in New Zealand. In total, more than 15 million people will practice earthquake safety in 2012 as part of the various ShakeOut drills. For more details about events or to register to participate in any of the drills visit www.shakeout.org.

ShakeOut is organized by the Earthquake Country Alliance, a partnership of the Southern California Earthquake Center, California Emergency Management Agency, USGS, California Earthquake Authority, the American Red Cross, and many others. Extensive information is available for the public and media at http://www.ShakeOut.org/California. Event details are available at www.shakeout.org/california/news.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact RJWestmore, Inc. Our new Version 3.0 system offers the best emergency training system.

Posted in BE SAFE, Earthquakes, Uncategorized

Shake, Rattle, and….Prepare?

Are you prepared for earthquakes?

The theme of many of our blogs is: “Are you prepared?” The reason for our keen focus on preparation is because history has shown us that the unpredictable will happen, and it probably won’t come with much advance warning. All we can do is prepare and plan. Proper planning before an earthquake can result in dramatic prevention of loss of life or property.

The Great California ShakeOut is an annual event that promotes earthquake preparedness for Californians. This year’s event is scheduled for October 21st, at 10:21 a.m. However, business and homeowners are encouraged to schedule events of their own, if timing of the official event is inconvenient.

So far, 6.5 million people and counting have registered to participate in this month’s ShakeOut. And there is still time to sign up. Encourage your team members and tenants to register and support this important event. The event is sharable via Facebook and Twitter, so encourage other business owners or managers to participate.

The scenarios and drills used in the ShakeOut are based on data from a hypothetical 7.8 magnitude quake on the San Andreas Fault. Results of the scenario are available in both a 24-page version and the full scientific 312-page version, courtesy of the USGS. You very likely won’t have time to read all 312 pages. But there is still much to glean from the main points of the exercise.

A free ShakeOut manual for business owners and managers provides suggestions for conducting drills to practice earthquake preparedness:

  • Drills cover, “Drop, Cover, and Hold On,” and other training that tenants can utilize in order to stay safe during a shaker.
  • The manual encourages actual interaction and discussion between tenants and drill organizers. Try to get people who actually work in the building to talk about earthquake safety. You might try to get some suggestions for improving evacuation routes or supplementing a shortage of emergency kits.
  • Go viral! Owners can share photos and stories from this year’s drill at www.ShakeOut.org
  • Advanced drills are detailed, including a “Business Operations Simulation Drill,” which can test your company’s ability to manage a disaster. The drill asks businesses to learn through simulations that involve problems such as loss of electricity, lack of cell phone service, or blocked emergency exits. Advanced drills are intended to mirror real earthquake emergencies.

Another component to the ShakeOut is “Secure Your Space.” This initiative covers not only how unsecured filing cabinets and picture frames can turn into hazards, but also why it’s necessary to retrofit buildings and adhere to proper codes

Similar to our last blog, which covered “Fire Prevention Week”, this post about the Great Shakeout is a good opportunity to raise immediate awareness about the subject. But real safety preparedness and planning involves more than information that can be covered in a single day. It’s great to promote awareness initiatives like the Shakeout to increase tenants’ exposure to safety issues, but be sure to have frequent refresher sessions and reminders about lessons learned. Knowledge about safety is useless it’s put into practice. So make sure proper procedures are followed.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact RJ Westmore, Inc. Our new Version 2.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. Visit RJWestmore.com for more information and remember to BE SAFE.